Monthly Archives: June 2015

Courses on the feminine; preparing for Jam on the Marsh

Last week I gave a course at Newlyn School of Art where we looked at, researched, and worked with the sacred feminine principle. We considered what the phrase ‘working from the feminine’ might mean… we worked with the breath, with moving the awareness around the body especially the heart, navel, base centre and womb; we responded with drawings to music (Schubert Violin works), to poetry from for example Rilke (his poem about the womb muscles of flowers opening to receive the sun) and also from indigenous peoples and Ursula LeGuin.

I highlighted the need for inner quietness in order to ‘hear’ the quiet inner voices of self and created/coming into being…

We moved from intense inner work to practical work such as preparing size, whiting and making grounds upon which to work with paper and panel.

We also looked at the animals which are associated with the Goddess/sacred feminine  from earlier times and from a  range of cultures; and we looked into their possible significance.

I gave demonstrations of working with watercolour in such a  way that the life of the work itself is given priority, where we step aside with our concerns  and our ego and  allow something else, previously unknown to us, to emerge.

Here are two testimonials/written responses to the Course:

Revelation sums up this unique course. Kate is an inspiration, sharing so generously and intelligently her subtle and sensitive approach to painting. She’s revealed a mysterious depth that has changed my art-making.  Professor Tanya Krzywinska 

I want to thank you offering such rich and inspirational guidance on your course this week. I so enjoyed every part of it, steeping in the music, poetry,references and the passion for life you bring to your teaching. I love the techniques of revealing the dreaming in the paint. I feel a subtle sleeping part of me re-emerging , a coming home feeling.
Immediate plans are afoot to make a studio in my home!  M.W.

 

I will be teaching this course again at Newlyn School of Art on August 24th – 26th. All welcome.

 

Tanya working on the feminine course

Tanya working on the feminine course

Otter with her work

Otter with her work

 

Megan with her work

Megan with her work

Lovely work by Bennie

Lovely work by Bennie

On July 11th I travel to Kent and on July 12th and 13th (both days 11 – 4 pm) I’ll be working in the lovely mediaeval Thomas a Beckett  Church at Fairfield, inviting people to co-create with me: I will ‘tune into’ them with my drum, and then make marks/images/words in response to what I pick up from the experience. They will be able to take the drawings/monotypes away…this is the process I worked with when I made the original drawings for Marc Almond’s album The Velvet Trail…

 

retweeted

Have your dreams turned into a piece of art by in Fairfield Church.

Embedded image permalink

St Thomas à Becket, Fairfield

St Thomas a Becket Church
St Thomas à Becket Church (Ack. 30)

St Thomas à Becket Church in Fairfield stands alone in a field on the Marsh, surrounded by water courses and sheep. A causeway was built in 1913, and until then the church was more often than not surrounded by water during the winter and spring.

Fairfield, the village it once served has long since disappeared, but the church has survived and is now part of a parish which includes the villages of Brookland, Brenzett and Snargate.

The church is dedicated to St Thomas à Becket, the Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until his murder in 1170. The church was built as a temporary structure of timber lath and plaster in c1200 to support the local farming community. From the outside it looks rather severe – the 13th century timber frame was encased in brickwork in the 18th century, and its immense roof covered in red tiles.

But entering the interior is like going back in time – the Georgian interior feels as though little has changed for over 200 years. Close the heavy door behind you, and all is peaceful and silent, except for the muffled sound of the wind. It is truly evocative of a bygone age.

In 1912 the fabric was in a very poor state and a complete rebuilding within the timber framework took place. However, the inside of the church was, fortunately, left untouched. It is Georgian, with a three decker pulpit, box pews and texts boards. The pews are still painted white with black linings.

The font is plain, and a design unique in Kent. The bowl has seven sides, perhaps a reminder of the seven sacrements of the church. It was originally located on the north side of the church, but is now in the centre, underneath the turret.

This iconic church has been used as a filming location, including 2011 BBC adaption of Great Expectations, Great Expectations (2012 film) and Parade’s End (TV series)

 

Map Icon Location Map

Aerial View of St Thomas a Becket
Aerial View of St Thomas à Becket see enlarged (Ack. 33)

St Thomas a Becket
Inside St Thomas a Becket

Kate Walters – I can draw your Dreams
Sun 12 July 11am – 4pm St Thomas a Becket, Fairfield TN29 9RZ
Mon 13 July 11am – 4pm St Thomas a Becket, Fairfield TN29 9RZ

Last week I gave a course at Newlyn School of Art where we looked at, researched, and worked with the sacred feminine principle. We considered what the phrase ‘working from the feminine’ might mean… we worked with the breath, with moving the awareness around the body especially the heart, navel, base centre and womb; we… Read more »